Cooper Union to Charge Undergraduate Tuition

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, which is one of the last remaining tuition-free colleges in the country but has been under severe financial strain, announced on Tuesday that for the first time in more than a century it will charge undergraduates to attend. The decision ends two years of roiling debate about instruction that was long revered as “free as air and water” and stood as the school’s most distinguishing feature. Cooper Union to Charge Undergraduate Tuition 

Moving home: The new key to success

After nine years in Brooklyn, N.Y., Emily Farris, Midwestern cuisine queen, decided she was sick of baking tuna casseroles in a kitchen that was also a hallway. “I was sharing a tiny apartment. I wanted to live like an adult,” she says, “and in New York I couldn’t afford to do that.”So she started thinking about where else she might like to live: Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., maybe Chicago.

But then, in 2008, she flew to her hometown of Kansas City to promote her new cookbook. “I was sitting in this plaza where there were lots of shops and restaurants,” she says. “I saw buses with bike racks on them. When I left Kansas City [in 2000] it seemed suburban and boring. But when I came back to visit, I saw people I wanted to be friends with.”

Moving home: The new key to success

This Column Is Not Sponsored by Anyone

nytimesThroughout our society, we are losing the places and institutions that used to bring people together from different walks of life. Sandel calls this the “skyboxification of American life,” and it is troubling. Unless the rich and poor encounter one another in everyday life, it is hard to think of ourselves as engaged in a common project. At a time when to fix our society we need to do big, hard things together, the marketization of public life becomes one more thing pulling us apart. “The great missing debate in contemporary politics,” Sandel writes, “is about the role and reach of markets.” We should be asking where markets serve the public good, and where they don’t belong, he argues. And we should be asking how to rebuild class-mixing institutions. This Column Is Not Sponsored by Anyone 

Community Colleges Not Up to 21st-Century Mission, Their Own Report Says

Calling the American dream imperiled, the American Association of Community Colleges issued a report on Saturday intended to galvanize college leaders to transform their institutions for the 21st-century needs of students and the economy.

Released here on the opening night of the group's annual conference, the report acknowledges the sector's historic growth and success but also argues that even so, far too many community-college students do not graduate. The study also found employment preparation inadequately connected to the needs of the job market, and a need for two-year colleges to work more closely with high schools and baccalaureate institutions.

Community Colleges Not Up to 21st-Century Mission, Their Own Report Says 

Trying to Find a Measure for How Well Colleges Do

New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and Accountability, a coalition of higher education groups. “We used to hear a lot more of, ‘The value of college can’t be measured,’ and now we hear more of, ‘Let’s talk about how we can measure.’ ”In January, the New Leadership Alliance released guidelines calling on colleges to systematically “gather evidence of student learning” — though not explicitly advocating standardized tests — and release the results. The report was endorsed by several major organizations of colleges and universities.

via Trying to Find a Measure for How Well Colleges Do

Higher education key to reviving economy

I am a community college student in Los Angeles. And I want to hear the candidates spell out what theyre planning to do to make higher education more affordable and more accessible. In California, public colleges and universities were hit hard by the recession. The state closed its budget gap in large part by slashing funding to higher education. Fees and tuition have risen as a result. At the community college level, fees have doubled and are set to increase again this fall.

Higher education key to reviving economy

The New Student Activism

“I’m not sure it would’ve happened if Occupy Wall Street wouldn’t have started,” said Marina Keegan, of the Morgan Stanley protest at Yale, where she is a senior. “Definitely people are starting to think more critically about their choices after graduation and how they affect not just themselves, but the world.”

The New Student Activism

Young Women Go Back to School Instead of Work

Workers are dropping out of the labor force in droves, and they are mostly women. In fact, many are young women. But they are not dropping out forever; instead, these young women seem to be postponing their working lives to get more education. There are now — for the first time in three decades — more young women in school than in the work force. Young Women Go Back to School Instead of Work

California community colleges set to ration classes!

During World War II, there was food rationing. In 2012, Californias community college leaders are poised to approve education rationing for thousands of students.

The proposal is controversial, with many students and educators critical of a shakeout that could end free courses offered for generations, including classes such as music appreciation and memoir writing. Also squeezed out would be students who linger at college for years, sampling one class after another.

via State community colleges set to ration classes.

Stanfords Dream of Silicon Valley II Dissolves Into Angry Recriminations

First came the surprise: Stanford University, perhaps the front-runner in a competition to build a big, new science-and-engineering campus on free land in New York City, suddenly withdrew on Friday.

Now come the recriminations: Did Stanford pull out because it took on more than it could handle and didnt want to face an embarrassing loss? Or did New York City pull a bait-and-switch on an unsuspecting partner?

Stanfords Dream of Silicon Valley II Dissolves Into Angry Recriminations

Employers Say College Graduates Lack Job Skills

According to the survey results, less than 10 percent of employers thought colleges did an "excellent" job of preparing students for work. Nearly 30 percent said finding the right applicant has grown harder in the past few years. On all hiring criteria included in the survey, such as adaptability and critical thinking, applicants were performing below employers expectations. Employers Say College Graduates Lack Job Skills

Deficit Supercommittee's Failure Triggers Steep Cuts for Education and Research

The panel's failure to produce a deficit-reduction plan triggers across-the-board cuts of roughly $1-trillion in discretionary spending over nine years, starting in the 2013 fiscal year. Unless Congress finds a way around the process, the Education Department's budget will be slashed by $3.54-billion in 2013, according to the Committee for Education Funding, an advocacy group. Deficit Supercommittee's Failure Triggers Steep Cuts for Education and Research

As Graduates Move Back Home, Economy Feels the Pain

Even before the recession began, young people were leaving home later; now the bad economy has tethered them there indefinitely. Last year, just 950,000 new households were created. By comparison, about 1.3 million new households were formed in 2007, the year the recession began, according to Mr. Zandi. Ms. Romanelli, who lives in the room where she grew up in Branford, Conn., said, “I don’t really have much of a choice,” adding, “I don’t have the means to move out.” As Graduates Move Back Home, Economy Feels the Pain